Palliative Care: Oncology Nurses’ Confidence in Provision to Patients With Cancer

Jyotsana Parajuli, PhD, MGS, RN; Judith E. Hupcey, EdD, RN, CRNP, FAAN; Lisa Kitko, RN, PhD, FAHA, FAAN; Barbara Birriel, PhD, RN, CRNP, FCCM
CJON
10.1188/21.CJON.449-455

Description

Background: Oncology nurses are key providers of care to patients with cancer in all healthcare settings. However, little is known about oncology nurses’ perceived confidence in providing all of the domains of palliative care.

Objectives: The objectives of this study were to examine oncology nurses’ perceived confidence in providing palliative care to patients with cancer and to identify the association between nurses’ demographic and professional characteristics and their perceived confidence.

Methods: A descriptive correlational design was employed. The sample included RNs who provided care to patients with cancer and were members of the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS). Participants completed an online survey consisting of 14 demographic questions and a 50-item palliative care confidence scale.

Findings: Three hundred sixty-six ONS members completed the survey. Results showed that most oncology nurses were confident to very confident in providing palliative care to patients with cancer, but they lacked confidence in providing the psychosocial, spiritual, and legal and ethical aspects of care. Years of experience as an oncology nurse and palliative care training were significantly associated with perceived confidence in providing palliative care.

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