Radiation Therapy

This fourth edition features expanded coverage on issues in radiation oncology nursing such as patient education, assessment, symptom management, documentation, radiation protection, and quality improvement. You'll also find included sections on evidence-based practice, new technology, pediatrics, palliative care, and more.
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The oral mucosa is made up of epithelial cells that regenerate every 7–14 days, making them easily damaged by chemotherapy and radiation therapy. When unable to regenerate, the oral mucosa becomes thinner and ulceration can occur, giving pathogens entry into the body. People with ulcerations in their oral mucosa are at significantly increased risk of infection, which can become severe and even life-threatening.
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If you are seeking resources related to determining nurse staffing in radiation oncology, the following organizations can help guide you. As part of its mission, the American College of Radiation Oncology (ACRO) has developed a Practice Accreditation Program, consisting of standards for radiation oncology. According to the Manual for ACRO Accreditation, general staffing recommendations call for 1 nurse per 200–300 new patients per year.
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Radiation Therapy Patient Care Record: A Tool for Documenting Nursing Care, a folder with inserts, provides a model documentation instrument for nurses to monitor radiation-induced side effects, management of these side effects, and patient education. It includes master forms as hard copies that can be duplicated for institutional use and as electronic copies for easy printing from your computer.
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